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Collateral Consequences of the Criminal Justice System – Durham

More than 1.6 million people in North Carolina have a criminal record. A misdemeanor or felony conviction of a crime may have far-reaching consequences, both criminal and civil. When a person is convicted of a crime, the sentence imposed by the judge contains the criminal consequences, which may include imprisonment, probation, fines, and other punishments. Additional consequences, often called civil or collateral consequences, also occur because of a conviction, but they are separate from the criminal sentence—they may arise automatically from the conviction and not be specifically imposed or even mentioned at sentencing in the criminal case.

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Criminal Justice

The ncIMPACT Initiative collaborates with the School’s Criminal Justice Innovation Lab, which seeks to promote a fair and effective criminal justice system, public safety, and economic prosperity. It works by engaging a broad range of stakeholders to examine the criminal justice system through an evidence-based perspective and promoting the use of a rigorous evidence-based approach to criminal justice policy. For example, our team is assisting with a pilot project that partners with chiefs of police in three locations to decrease arrests and instead give citations to nonviolent criminals.

The ncIMPACT series, produced in partnership with UNC-TV Public Media NC and Civic Federal Credit Union, also features criminal justice content. Topics include the Stepping Up Initiative to divert select individuals for mental and behavioral health treatment instead of incarceration in county jails, re-entry programs to help individuals released from incarceration to find employment, and the Durham Expunction and Restoration program that assists residents with overcoming the collateral consequences of involvement with the criminal justice system that make it difficult for them to access employment, housing, and transportation.

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